Schedule

Date: Monday January 28, 2008
Location: Old Arts - Theatre E

These videos are embedded with mv_embed, which supports playback via the OggPlay plugin for Firefox, vlc-plugin or generic application/ogg.

TimeAgenda
9:00-9:30Introduction
Conrad Parker
9:30-10:10Foundations of Open Media Software workshop summary
Silvia Pfeiffer and FOMS participants
| audio
10:10-10:30Morning Tea
10:30-11:20Dirac Video Compression System
Anuradha Suraparaju, BBC Research

Theora intro
Timothy Terriberry, Xiph.Org
| audio
11:20-11:30Moving Time
11:30-12:20Ogg Roadmap
Christopher "Monty" Montgomery, Xiph.Org

FOSS Codecs for Online Video: Usability, Uptake and Development
Anna Helme, Engagemedia

FOSS Multimedia Toolkits for Non-Profits
Andrew Lowenthal, TacticalTech
audio
12:20-13:30Lunch break
13:30-14:20Lightning Talks
Open broadcast tools
Steven Ellis, OpenMedia

Introducing Gloss - A Clutter based MythTV frontend
Josh Stewart
3D audio in Croquet
Denis Crowdy, Macquarie University
audio
14:20-14:30Moving Time
14:30-15:20Survivor Melanesia - Ethnomusicologist vs Annodex
Denis Crowdy, Macquarie University
OggPlay and Firefox
Shane Stephens, Xiph.Org
Metavid
Michael Dale, Metavid
audio
15:20-15:40Afternoon Tea
15:40-16:30Adventures in Consumer Electronics with GStreamer
Mikko Leppänen, Nokia

FFADO: Firewire audio on Linux
Jonathan Woithe
| audio
16:30-16:40Moving Time
16:40-17:30Ingex - tapeless television production using Linux
Stuart Cunningham, BBC
| audio

Abstracts

Foundations of Open Media Software workshop summary
Silvia Pfeiffer and FOMS participants

Foundations of Open Media Software (FOMS) is a focussed workshop where developers of open media software meet to collaborate on code and plan future technology.
This presentation provides a summary of workshop outcomes, such as development goals for the coming year. Of course, some of this hacking will take place during the course of LCA :-) Come along and join the fun.

Dirac Video Compression System
Anuradha Suraparaju, BBC Research
25 minutes

The BBC has worked in the field of video compression for more than 50 years. Over the past few years the BBC has developed an open technology video compression system called Dirac which is comparable with the latest standards, H264/MPEG-4 AVC, and VC-1. Potential uses of this codec include Internet distributions such as web-clips, video on demand and IPTV. Dirac technology may be used for a wide range of applications from low resolution for mobile phones and the Internet though HDTV and to ultra-high resolution Digital Cinema. The Dirac technology has been extended for high quality post production use. It can also be utilised for desktop production over IP networks, file storage and video editing.
This development, called Dirac Pro, is an extension to the Dirac family of codecs. This talk will provide an overview of the history and background of the Dirac Video Compression system, brief description of the compression technology used, implementations of Dirac in software and hardware, standardisation efforts and future developments.

Homepage: http://www.bbc.co.uk/rd/projects/dirac/index.shtml

FOSS Codecs for Online Video: Usability, Uptake and Development
Anna Helme, Engagemedia

Over the last 40 years the means to create and disseminate the moving image have become increasingly democratised. From Portapaks to camcorders, VHS to DVD, video technologies have continued to open access to ordinary people to tell their own stories. The explosion of online video distribution has brought new opportunities and challenges for those committed to making sure these technologies are not just available to purchase and use, but that their evolution can be shaped collectively; that they are free to be modified, built upon and shared. There is a growing need to ensure that the technologies for distributing our media are not held in the hands of a small number of corporations, locked in onerous patents or trapped by proprietary software that may be priced out of our reach at any moment.
The "FOSS Codecs for Online Video" research report authored by EngageMedia in 2007 is a review of available tools for the creation, playback and embedding of online video using Free and Open Source Software video codecs and a look at the most pressing areas for development to enhance their adoption by social change video projects on the web. It seeks to outline how FOSS codecs and containers might be more easily implemented by the Transmission network of social-change online video distribution projects for which this report was originally envisioned.
Beyond the ethical reasons for choosing FOSS there are also a range of practical reasons. Most social-change video makers cannot afford proprietary tools or have more pressing financial priorities. Additionally, with the right approach, open source development practices can facilitate the rapid development of software that is just as good or even better than their proprietary equivalents. Whilst many activist groups have a commitment to using FOSS generally, most currently employ or promote proprietary video codecs such as Flash, Quicktime and Windows Media. This however is largely due to the historical lack of easy ways to employ FOSS solutions in this area, a problem this research aims to help change.
An outline of the findings of this report will be followed by a presentation of EngageMedia's FOSS video-sharing platform Plumi, built upon the Plone content management system.

Report: http://wiki.transmission.cc/index.php/FOSS_Codecs_For_Online_Video:_Usability_Uptake_and_Development_1.2

Plumi: http://plumi.org/

Survivor Melanesia - Ethnomusicologist vs Annodex
Denis Crowdy, Macquarie University
25 minutes

The storage and retrieval of video and audio recordings for ethnomusicological research is an obvious application of annotation and compressed media technology. Although there are proprietary systems for ethnographic research that can be used, the benefits of open source formats and applications lie in ensuring the longevity of accessing such data. This becomes a critical issue where digital archives are concerned.
This paper explores my role in the development of a simple web based system to store, annotate, search and retrieve audio and video data built on top of Annodex libraries and tools. As an amateur in software development, I focus on how this was possible by discussing experiences with documentation and example code, but most importantly the intellectual generosity of a range of professional software engineers involved in open source development is detailed as most critical.
The case study used is an application titled "arkaiv" which has been trialled as part of a research project funded by Macquarie University exploring appropriate technology (solar powered multitrack recording) and archiving tools in Melanesia. Success from this project has resulted in its use in a larger research project funded by the Australian Research Council exploring the music industries in Melanesia, with over a thousand media files currently annotated and stored.
The aim is to make observations that might be useful to people building the libraries and underlying technology that makes such activity a realistic proposition for an increasing population of open source software development enthusiasts without professional training and skills.

Homepage: http://motekulo.blogspot.com/

Adventures in Consumer Electronics with GStreamer
Mikko Leppänen, Nokia
25 minutes

What does it feel like? What does it mean to create a consumer electronics device with GStreamer?
There are many awesome businesses around open source. But what if you are not offering a service, not dealing with other companies? What if you are offering something concrete that the consumers, non-technological users, "normal people", can pick up and throw through windows? Can free software, such as Gstreamer, and random pieces of hardware be combined in to something that is actually valuable?
The opportunity is huge. I will start with a heartbreaking confession titled "Why we love GStreamer". It contains gems like 24/7 interactive support and the joys of plugging. GStreamer is lovely, but end users can be pesky and ungrateful[1]. Consumers want to watch news streams and play their music files. Even when they are in "Evil" formats. On the follow-through there will be bits about scheduling, quality assurance and various release cycles. Practical experiences and tales are based on the creation of Nokia N810 Internet Tablet multimedia framework. In theory it is Gstreamer 0.10.13, in practise describing it needs more than a single sentence.
[1] This presentation represents only my personal views and not those of my employer.

Homepage: http://maemo.org

Ingex - tapeless television production using Linux
Stuart Cunningham, BBC
25 minutes

Television productions have traditionally recorded video onto video tape which requires a time consuming "ingest" step before the video footage can be edited in post-production. Tapeless recording solutions exist but are frequently beyond the budget of many television productions. The Ingex system records multiple broadcast video and audio streams and encodes them in real-time with open source tools such as ffmpeg, using cost-effective PC hardware running Linux.
This talk describes how we have developed an open-source television recording system. We show how we extended exiting software tools with the necessary functionality for a professional studio environment, such as support for standardised file formats including MXF and AAF. Examples will be given from our trials with Dragons' Den and Eastenders television productions.

Homepage: http://ingex.sourceforge.net


Lightning talks

Introducing Gloss - A Clutter based MythTV frontend
Josh Stewart
Lightning talk

Many people have commented that, whilst being highly functional, the MythTV frontend now looks dated when compared to Microsoft's MCE and Apple's FrontRow. After repeatedly seeing "Don't like it? Show us some code!" type comments on the mythtv mailing list and to show that linux is capable of shiny media interfaces as well, I began working on an alternative, drop-in replacement for the original MythTV frontend using the Clutter OpenGL framework and gstreamer. The primary aim of the project is to provide a visually richer, composited/accelerated interface for MythTV in a way such that any existing MythTV frontend could be replaced without any major reconfiguration. Gloss has now been in casual developement for a numbers of months and this talk would outline the upcoming goals of the project and demonstrate its current status via a screencast.

Website: http://code.google.com/p/gloss-mc/

FOSS Multimedia Toolkits for Non-Profits
Andrew Lowenthal, TacticalTech
Lightning talk

Non-profits should have a natural affinity to free software tools. Beyond a few well known applications however uptake of FOSS by non-profits is relatively low. This presentation will take you through the NGO-in-a-Box series and discuss it's approach to making free software more accessible.